Notes on German Culture

If a nobleman wanted a woman, he simply took possession of her

That is how it was in the first half of the Middle Ages... from the 5th to 11th centuries. If a nobleman wanted a woman, he simply took possession of her. The concept of love and chivalry were unknown. But, by the end of the 12th century, leaders such as the German Kaiser Heinrich VI… Continue reading If a nobleman wanted a woman, he simply took possession of her

History Highlights

Henry the Lion submits to Frederick Barbarossa, 1181 in Erfurt

Heinrich der Löwe (Henry the Lion) was one of the most powerful German princes of his time… but he lost it all when he angered Kaiser Friedrich I, Barbarossa (Frederick Barbarossa). The image here depicts the moment that Henry the Lion submits to Frederick Barbarossa, 1181 in Erfurt. The painting is by Peter Janssen, 1882,… Continue reading Henry the Lion submits to Frederick Barbarossa, 1181 in Erfurt

History Highlights, Notes on German Culture

German Eagles…single head 640 years, double-headed 366 years, then single head ever since 1871.

The double-headed eagle symbol of the Holy Roman Empire started in 1440, while the name change “of the German Nation” was added in 1512. The double headed eagle was introduced in 1440 to emphasize the religious and secular nature of the empire, and it replaced the single headed eagle that was used 640 years by… Continue reading German Eagles…single head 640 years, double-headed 366 years, then single head ever since 1871.

First Reich...800 to 1806, Notes on German Culture, Teutonic Knights..Deutscher Orden

For 300 years two men were included in the daily prayers of the Teutonic Knights

The Teutonic Knights were warrior monks who fought to convert pagans to Christianity and also built and governed their Monastic State of the Teutonic Order all along the Baltic coast in northern Europe. At the core of their organization was a group of 3000 highly trained and well equipped warrior monks...men who also gave up… Continue reading For 300 years two men were included in the daily prayers of the Teutonic Knights